Macrosomia

Macrosomia

While the average newborn weighs about 7 lbs., some babies are born much larger. A baby that weighs more than 9 lbs. 15 oz. is considered macrosomic. Such infants are at a higher risk for certain health complications. They can also create complications for the mother during pregnancy.

What is Macrosomia?

Macrosomia occurs when a baby gets more nutrients than needed in utero, causing her or him to grow faster than normal. This occurs in about 10 percent of babies. While doctors are not exactly sure why some babies grow more than others, there are certain factors involving the birth mother that increase the risk for a baby to be macrosomic:

  • Mother has type 1, type 2, or gestational diabetes.
  • Mother is obese.
  • Mother gains more than 35 pounds during pregnancy.
  • Mother has delivered another macrocosmic baby.
  • Mother is past her full-term due date.
  • Mother is are older than 35.

Symptoms include excessive amniotic fluid or a large fundal height (the distance from the top of the uterus to the pubic bone).

What Complications are Associated with Macrosomia?

Various complications can result from fetal macrosomia. For the baby, these include:

  • low blood sugar levels
  • childhood obesity
  • metabolic syndrome
  • other birth injuries

For the mother, complications include:

  • uterine rupture
  • genital tract lacerations
  • labor problems
  • bleeding after delivery
  • C-section section delivery

How Can Macrosomia be Associated with Medical Malpractice?

When macrosomia has been established, doctors must monitor the mother and baby very closely, be prepared for a C-section or early delivery, and most importantly, be skillful and careful in handling all issues during pregnancy, labor, and delivery to minimize the risk of the complications listed above. When they fail to do so, it may be considered negligence. Negligence may include:

  • inappropriate use of delivery instruments
  • injury to the mother or child due to forced vaginal birth (failure to perform a C-section)
  • improper administering of medications or anesthesia
  • failure to inform the mother about risks and ways to manage the condition

Let Thurswell Law Represent You for Your Baby’s Macrosomia

If you feel that you did not receive adequate care or your doctor was negligent in handling your baby’s macrosomia, and if you and your child were injured as a result, you may have a case for medical malpractice. A skilled attorney at Thurswell Law can do the leg work for you, with no fee unless you collect monetary compensation. Contact us today to schedule a free consultation at (248) 354-2222.

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Southfield, MI 48075

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